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The Garden of Disappearing Letters 사라져가는 문자들의 정원

The artist created the artwork by going through two processes of landscaping and shaping of 24 pillars left behind the Kim Chung-Up Architecture Museum Culture Nuri Hall. The landscape in the center of the colonnade is shaped as the Chinese character ‘gui 龜’ meaning tortoise, it originated from ‘guiboo 龜趺’ that confirmed the large scale of Anyangsa. Guiboo is a footstone in tortoise shape to erect a monument since Shilla period. But, in The Garden of Disappearing Letters, the artist uses the plant Dwarf Japanese Yew to write the tortoise ‘Gui 龜’ in place of the Guiboo that supports the pillar. The design of the letters was inspired from the three ‘gui’ characters engraved on a rock wall of Sammaksa in the Mt. Samseong in three different designs by the calligraphist and poet Ji Woonyeong from the late Choseon Dynasty.

8 of the 24 pillars in the middle row were covered with gold sculptures. Each of the pillars are filled with writings of letters from 8 cultures such as Cuneiform letters of Sumer, Maya script, which are no longer used, and Hunminjeongeum, or traditional Chinese characters that are disappearing because they are not used. These disappearing letters are in the same fate as the pillars that represent the old buildings we cannot find the traces of. The artist honors the memories of the past history the space retains by engraving disappeared letters on the pillars scattered without walls of roof.

 

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